BALANCE and TTC Partner on New Streetcar Orientation Session

On June 26, 2018, the Toronto Transit Commission hosted BALANCE for Blind Adults for a private group orientation session for the new low floor streetcars. Twelve BALANCE service users and 5 BALANCE staff attended the exclusive session that had been organized by request of BALANCE for Blind Adults. Hosted by TTC Travel Trainer Desrianne McIlwrick, David the Driver Instructor and other TTC managers and staff, the event was hugely successful with participants rating the session as “excellent” and providing feedback that they  will now be much more confident when using the new streetcars. BALANCE thanks O and M instructor Anita Laurnitus for taking the initiative to bring this idea forward and for representing BALANCE during the organization of the event. TTC did a wonderful job of hosting, teaching and informing us all! We look forward to many more such opportunities between our two organizations in the future.

group entering the streetcar at accessible door group opportunity to explore the streetcar from front to back, and explore any features they needed togroup listening to presentation with Driver instructor looking on guide dogs resting Presto card practice with O and M instructor looking on small group chatting about streetcar features stop request button practice close up by blind participant Passenger emergency button and stop and ramp request button console participant completes survey with TTC employee group listening to presenter while seated or standing in the stationary streetcar

Wonders of the Apple Watch: Part 2

by Chelsea Mohler, AT Instructor, BALANCE

Who is Siri anyway?

OK, now, I confess, onto my favourite topic—Siri!  Who doesn’t love that personal assistant in your ear giving you reminders, directions, or life advice, ok, maybe not the advice.  I know for me, Siri was one of the major reasons I bothered to purchase any Apple product. Although sometimes Siri can frustrate us to no end, it also comes in really handy—especially when trying to send lengthy texts or call someone from our contacts.  Let’s face it, Siri makes our lives a lot easier!

So, why all this talk about Siri? Well, the Apple Watch incorporates the Siri feature, and as a result, many of the things we are familiar with on our other devices. There are some differences to be aware of, though, so let’s take a look at those.

Siri on the Apple Watch

The most noticeable difference is that Siri doesn’t speak as he/she does on iOS devices. Instead the response appears on the screen of the watch and the wearer either drags their finger around to have the VoiceOver voice read the content or uses Digital Crown Navigation to do so. This may at first seem a bit odd, but in actual fact you don’t even notice once you’ve got used to it. As the wearer is going to have raised their wrist to use Siri in the first place it’s not a great stretch to using your finger or the Digital Crown to read the screen once Siri responds. As with most new things it’s worth spending some time getting used to the slightly different functionality of the Apple Watch, you will certainly find that it is well worth it.

How to use Siri on the Apple Watch

Now, you might be wondering how to use Siri on the Apple watch.  Well, there are a couple of ways to use Siri on the Apple Watch. The first is to tap the screen once to wake the watch up, raise your wrist and say “Hey Siri.” Time for another confession—that’s my all time favourite approach, unless, of course, you are in a loud space where the watch may not pick up your voice. The second way to activate Siri is to press and hold the Digital Crown before giving Siri an instruction or asking it a question. In both cases and assuming that you have haptic feedback enabled on your Apple Watch, you will feel two taps in quick succession on your wrist when Siri is awake and ready to receive instructions/questions. Then, go on ahead and speak your command to Siri!